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Inside a Mid-Country English Tudor Revival Manor Designed by Douglas VanderHorn Architects (PHOTOS)

Inside a Mid-Country English Tudor Revival Manor Designed by Douglas VanderHorn Architects (PHOTOS)

Inside a Mid-Country English Tudor Revival Manor Designed by Douglas VanderHorn Architects (PHOTOS)
June 03
11:34 2019

Inside a Mid-Country English Tudor Revival Manor Designed by Douglas VanderHorn Architects

Greenwich, Connecticut, United States

Greenwich-based firm Douglas VanderHorn Architects designed a faithful creation of an English Tudor Revival residence to fit seamlessly into an existing historic neighbourhood of similar styled homes. The exclusive enclave was designed by famed landscape architects, the Olmsted Brothers. Douglas VanderHorn Architects described the project on their Houzz page, “A masterful use of forms, textures and materials provides a rich palette of architectural features. The graduated slate roof, with its majestic octagonal brick chimney flues on a stone base, is punctuated by hipped and engaged dormers. The gabled ends of the foremost projecting bays are trimmed with wide barge boards and roof finials. Brick infill is laid in a variety of patterns between the half timbering at the second floor, projecting over the stone walls of the first floor below. Adjacent gable ended bays feature full height stone walls. A sloped stone water table provides a continuous cap to the stone base that anchors the house. Special attention was paid to the custom designed interiors that continue the English Tudor aesthetic. Generous sized rooms are rich in character, from the plaster beamed ceiling of the living room to the wood trussed ceiling of the family room.” Impressive in scale, quality and the materials used, this large Tudor Revival is proof that new construction can incorporate the charm and detail of the past. The residence extends 11,000 square feet with interiors decorated by Nancy Boszhardt. We’ve included architectural drawings below, including floor plans! 

















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