1803 Gloucester Manor Includes Private Cemetery for $1.9M in Natchez, Mississippi

1803 Gloucester Manor Includes Private Cemetery for $1.9M in Natchez, Mississippi

$1,999,000 | Built 1803 | 9,000 Sq. Ft. | 8 Beds | 6.5+ Baths | 8.04 Acres
201 Lower Woodville Road, Natchez, Mississippi, United States, 39120

Referred to as “Gloucester”, this impressive brick Neo-Classical manor is on the market for $1.9 million in Natchez, Mississippi. Originally known as Bellevue, the 9,000 square foot residence was designed by local architect Levi Weeks and built in 1803 for David Williams. The main house sits on a 5.75 acre estate in the middle of historic Natchez and also includes its own cemetery across the street on an additional 2.28 acres. Gloucester was the home to the first Governor of the Mississippi territory, and is the oldest of the Natchez mansions. The home includes Scalamandré window treatments throughout, the oldest marble fireplace in the lower Mississippi Valley and the original summer kitchen perfectly intact from the time period. Gloucester is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The main house is approximately 9,000 square feet with approximately 3,000 square feet on each of its three levels. Gloucester includes two guest houses, each with a separate bedroom, bath, living and kitchen area. Gloucester hit the market in September 2020 for $2.35 million and is currently on the market for $1.9 million with Sue Gallaspy of Keller Williams Elite Realty. Photography and information found on agent’s listing.

Repository Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Digital Id ppmsca 23946

History of Gloucester: The mansion was built for David Williams in 1800, who, according to census records of 1782, 1786 and 1792 was one of the wealthiest men in the country at the time. Bellevue was the centerpiece of a 5,000 acre plantation owned by David Williams adjacent to several thousand acres of cotton, tobacco and timber plantations that he owned. Later, the house was inherited by Maria McIntosh Williams, the wife of Winthrop Sargent (1753–1820), who served as the first Governor of the Mississippi Territory from 1798 to 1801. Sargent expanded the house and its gardens in 1808. It was then inherited by their son, George Washington Sargent, who was killed inside the house by Union forces in the American Civil War of 1861–1865.

Ralph Clynne – Library of Congress, Prints and Photograph Division HABS: MISS,1-NATCH.V,1-2

 



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