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1930s Holmby Hills Estate Built for Mobster Bugsy Siegel Torn Down After Selling for $17.5M (PHOTOS & VIDEO)

1930s Holmby Hills Estate Built for Mobster Bugsy Siegel Torn Down After Selling for $17.5M (PHOTOS & VIDEO)

1930s Holmby Hills Estate Built for Mobster Bugsy Siegel Torn Down After Selling for $17.5M (PHOTOS & VIDEO)
August 09
15:02 2019


1930s Holmby Hills Estate Built for Mobster Bugsy Siegel Torn Down After Selling for $17.5M

250 Delfern Drive, Los Angeles, California, United States, 90077

It’s been several years since this property was redeveloped but we figured it was still worth mentioning. Notorious mobster Bugsy Siegel had the house built in 1938 for his wife and children. The house reportedly had several secret panels, a pivoting bookcase, secret closets and a linen closet with a trapdoor. The couple split in 1946 and Bugsy was infamously murdered a year later in Virginian Hill’s home about 3 minutes from this one. It was later owned by film producer, director and writer, Bud Yorkin, who directed and produced the 1958 Emmy Award winning television special “An Evening with Fred Astaire.” It was likely under Yorkin’s ownership that a 35mm screening room was incorporated into the floor plan. It’s been described as “one of the great estates of Holmby Hills” with a classical hall with sweeping staircase, a 60-foot long living room, dark oak panelled library and formal dining room. There was more than 10,500 square feet with five bedrooms and eight bathrooms. The grounds were extensive with rolling lawns, fountains, a formal rose garden with gazebo, a 60-foot swimming pool and a championship tennis court with viewing pavilion. The 1.84 acre property made its debut on the market in February of 2010 when Bud Yorkin and wife Cynthia Sikes listed it for an ambitious $49,500,000. It dropped to $32,500,000 by November and was reduced a handful more times until it eventually sold in February 2013 for $17,500,000 to hedge fund mogul Jon Brooks and wife Shanna. By December of that year everything on the property had been cleared except the tennis court – which is now gone. By March of 2015, construction of a new modern residence was underway with construction lasting into early 2019. This property is in close-proximity to another tear down we recently covered. The 1930s Colonial home from the 1981 film Mommie Dearest was also torn down after selling for $18,800,000.

 

New residence at 250 Delfern Drive under construction

 

New residence at 250 Delfern Drive under construction

 

New residence at 250 Delfern Drive under construction

 

New residence at 250 Delfern Drive under construction

 

 

J.H. Graham

 



 

 

 

 









 





    

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