£6.25 Million Grade II* Listed Tudor Manor Westwood Park

Savills

Savills

£6.25 Million Grade II* Listed Tudor Manor Westwood Park

£6,250,000 | 9 Beds | 4 Baths | 52.32 Acres
Little Horkesley, Colchester, CO6 4BS

Westwood Park, originally built in 1692, was rebuilt in Elizabethan style by W. J. M. Hill c. 1908. There is a substantial range of outbuildings, including potting/tool sheds, greenhouses, stables and a summerhouse. The outbuildings have the potential to be developed subject to the necessary consents being obtained. The mature formal gardens, grounds and pastures were redesigned over 100 years ago and comprise of specimen trees, a large walled garden, rose and herbaceous borders, wrought ironwork, rose and yew walks, an apple and pear arcade, spinneys and ponds. There is planning permission for a log cabin to be constructed in the hedged area behind the barn, this needs to be mobile compliant, the reinforced concrete slab has already been completed. The estate is located between the villages of Great Horkesley to the north-west and West Bergholt to the south-east with much of the estate lying in the parish of Little Horkesley. The land slopes away from the site towards the banks of the River Stour, with the Dedham Vale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty to the north-east.

Savills

Westwood Park is a beautiful Grade II* listed Tudor Manor House dating back to the 17th Century set in stunning gardens and grounds. The property is ideally located close to the Roman town of Colchester in the Stour Valley, made famous by the paintings of John Constable who depicted themes from around the neighbouring villages including Nayland, Dedham and East Bergholt. The nearby villages of Great Horkesley, Nayland and Stoke-by-Nayland all have excellent local facilities including various shops, post offices, a doctors’ surgery and public houses/restaurants. Colchester, the oldest recorded town in England, offers a much wider range of recreational, shopping and educational facilities and the commuter can take advantage of a regular inter-city train service from Colchester to London’s Liverpool Street Station, the journey taking from 50 minutes. The property is highly accessible to Colchester with the town centre and train station located approximately 4 miles away. The property also has good links with the A12 which provides a direct route to London, Ipswich and Cambridge via the A14. The A12 link will improve further once the proposed new junction to the north of Colchester is complete. The A120 is also accessible which provides access to Stansted Airport.

Savills

The estate is located between the villages of Great Horkesley to the north-west and West Bergholt to the south-east with much of the estate lying in the parish of Little Horkesley. The land slopes away from the site towards the banks of the River Stour, with the Dedham Vale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty to the north-east. The earliest surviving record of Westwood Park dates from 1385-6. The Westwood Estate was developed by the Lynne family in the seventeenth century, with Westwood Park built in 1692. In 1906 Captain Hill extended the house and refashioned the house in the Jacobethan style. Westwood Park is a red brick house with stone dressings and red clay tile roofs and is characterised by its Dutch gables, octagonal chimney stacks and mullioned and leaded windows. The house is in a secluded location which cannot be viewed from the road and is situated within a series of walled gardens and lawns in excess of 10 acres, with the larger historic parkland beyond. The 18th century ornamental gardens or Pleasure Grounds’ are located to the north of the site, and a terrace extends along the western side of the house facing the west lawn. This lawn is shaded by a number of mature trees, most notably a large Cedar of Lebanon which occupies a central position. A gate reputedly from Dick Whittington’s London home leads into a wilderness garden which runs alongside the 18th century ornamental lily pond containing koi carp.

Savills

Internally the house benefits from an exceptionally large, panelled hallway and entertaining area, with a historic oak staircase and galleried landing leading to the principal bedrooms. The hallway opens directly into the principal reception rooms which are mostly decorated with moulded ceilings, Jacobean style oak panelling and carved oak fireplaces. The first floor bedrooms are mostly decorated in a neo-classical style. A separate two storey chauffer’s home on the east of the house is built of red brick with red tile details and was designed in an Arts and Crafts style. A woodland path runs around the perimeter of the estate. A fibre broadband connection runs directly from the exchange direct to the house (giving an uncontended internet connection of 100Mb.) Hot water is generated from thermal solar panels in the summer. The Main House includes 5 bathrooms and 4 ground floor WC cloakrooms. Both the Main House and East Apartment have bespoke handmade Humphrey Munson kitchens. The Main House also has a dressing room and study handmade and installed by Humphrey Munson.


Tim Phillips • tmphillips@savills.com • +44 (0) 20 7075 2806
Stephen Whiteswhite@savills.com • +44 (0) 1245 293 221
Savills
Photography Credit: Savills



Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills



Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills



Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills



Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills
Savills



Savills
Savills