Fire That Destroyed Historic c.1899 Colonial Revival in Concord, MA Started in Chimney (PHOTOS & VIDEO)

Fire That Destroyed Historic c.1899 Colonial Revival in Concord, MA Started in Chimney

240 Fairhaven Hill Road, Concord, Massachusetts, United States, 01742

It’s believed that failing mortar in one of the chimneys of a c.1899 Colonial Revival is what caused the devastating fire that ultimately destroyed the mansion. NBC Boston reported that a breach in the mortar allowed very hot gases to escape and ignite parts of the mansion’s structure. The landmark historic residence overlooked the Sudbury River in Concord, Massachusetts. The fire is believed to have started in the lower level and quickly spread to the two upper levels. Water pressure and supply problems proved to be a major disadvantage. According to CBSN Boston, the lack of hydrants in the neighbourhood required crews to bring in tanker trucks carrying tens of thousands of gallons of water. CBSN Boston also reported that the homeowner’s were not home when the fire started and that two workers were able to escape unscathed. WCVB5 ABC noted that the 6,500 square foot home was designed by Boston architect H.D. Hale and built c.1899 for Charles Francis Adams III, a great-grandson of President John Quincy Adams and was also the first of two large country estates not associated with farming in the town. Property records reveal that the 12.81 acre estate was worth close to $2,800,000. It’s a total loss. All photos belong to WCVB5 ABC.